Past Meetings

Wednesday, May 11, 2005
Characterization of Counterfeit Banknotes by Vibrational and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy
Gene S. Hall, Ph.D.

Two technological developments contributed to the invention of paper money by the Chinese. First development was the invention of paper in A.D. 109 in China by Tai Sung. The second development was the invention of ink in A.D. 200. Subsequently these developments lead to the printing of the first banknote in China, a ten Kwan note, under the Tang dynasty, A.D. 650-6. As trading between China and other countries intensified, other countries began to print and use banknotes.

The counterfeiting of banknotes has been an old profession and it continues today with the use of modern graphical aids such as computers, high-resolution scanners and high-resolution ink jet printers. Individuals have printed counterfeit banknotes for their own use and greed. The quality of these banknotes is usually low but some individuals are known to have printed high quality counterfeit banknotes. Also high quality counterfeiting by governments to destabilize other governments’ economy are well documented in history.

With this in mind, our laboratory has been involved with the non-destructive characterization of bank notes by micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), micro Raman and micro attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). Using these complimentary spectroscopic techniques, our strategy has been to determine the sources of the paper, printing inks, and security stripes in the banknotes.

In this talk, I will share with you some specific examples from my laboratory on the characterization of banknotes that will include the famous “Bernard” notes of WW II, counterfeit colonial America banknotes, and counterfeit modern day US and British banknotes. Details of instrumentation, sample preparation, database construction, and conclusions will also be presented.

NYMS members and their guests are welcome to join the speaker for dinner (at own expense) at 5:30pm at Bello Restaurant, 863 9th Ave. (56th St.). Please reserve your place(s) with Peter Diaczuk by noon May 9. The number to call for making dinner reservations only is 917-578- 3049.

NYMS Meetings are free and open to all.

COURSE:

Bernard Friedman Memorial Workshop

Polarized Light Microscopy

April 30, May 7, 14 & 21, 2005

An advanced course on polarized light microscopy which will cover the following topics:
The nature of polarized light
The origin and interpretation of interference colors
Birefringence and crystal orientation , The Indicatrix
Compensation and variable compensators
Interference figures and their interpretation

The workshop will consist of four Consecutive Saturdays of lectures and hands on labs to cover the theoretical and practical aspects of polarized light microscopy. The course instructors include Jan Hinsch of Leica, Inc., Mary McCann of McCann Imaging, John Reffner of Smith Detection and N.Y.M.S. Instructor Don O’Leary.

WHEN: April 30, May 7, 14 & 21, 2005, from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.
WHERE: 30 North Mountain Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07042. Phone (973) 744-0043
COST: $395 for N.Y.M.S. members, $425 for non-members (includes membership)
Lunch and course materials are included. Checks made out to N.Y.M.S.

WHO: advanced course for those who have completed “The Use of the Microscope” or are experienced in microscopy and familiar with the theory of its use.

HOW: Register using the form below. Limited to the first 12 registrants.
Return form to Don O’Leary, 6 Chittenden Road, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.

John Jay College and

NY Microscopical Society

Present

3rd Annual Microscope Day

Tuesday, April 19, 2005 Rm. 614B

BMW Building at 555 W. 57th St. (btwn 10th and 11th Aves)

10:30am – Peter Diaczuk & Lawrence Kobilinsky, John Jay College, Opening Remarks

11:00am – James Gannalo, Independent Consultant, Unusual Chamber Markings: Pattern

Recognition Used to Solve a Homicide

12:00pm – Betty Faber, Liberty Science Center, Entomology

12:45pm – Marty Eber & Kathy Lindsley, Olympus, State of the Art Digital Imaging and

New Developments in Light Microscopy

1:30pm – Craig Huemmer and Frani Kammerman, John Jay College, Forensic Microscopy

2:00pm – John R. Reffner, Rohm & Haas, Cryo-SEM of Latex Polymers

2:45pm – Fenella G. France, Art Preservation Services, Conservation & Science from Macro Micro

3:30pm – John A. Reffner, Smiths Detection, Infra Red Microprobe Analysis of Drugs

4:15pm – Closing Remarks

**Olympus will display their current line of stereo and polarized light microscopes,

courtesy of NJ Scientific.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Come to any or all of the presentations.

Photo Identification is required for entrance into the building. Times are tentative and subject

change.

For more information, contact Peter Diaczuk at pdiaczuk@jjay.cuny.edu or Meghan Miller at mmiller@jjay.cuny.edu

Meeting Announcement

Applications of Modern Microscopy Methods to Biomedical Research at the
University of Iowa

Kenneth Moore, Ph.D.

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 – 7:30 p.m.
John Jay College, 445 W 59th St. (10th Ave.), NY, NY 10019 – Room 1311, 1st Floor

Microscopy is an essential tool for developing strategies in the treatment of disease. Negative staining and cryo-electron microscopy are critical in understanding the structure of native and hybrid vectors for their potential in gene therapy applications. Enzyme cytochemistry is used for the detection of markers that aid in determining the rate of gene transfer to cells. Immunocytochemistry is required to identify gene products. Light, confocal and electron microscopy are critical to evaluate pathogenesis, inflammation and cellular changes. For much of the past decade, Kenneth Moore and his colleagues have been working to identify the specific gene and cell structure that is compromised in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Significant effort has been expended to identify effective viral and other vectors for transfer of the normal gene construct. In addition to Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. Moore is also involved with investigations for genetic therapy of hemophilia, hypertension, neurological problems,cancer and various skin disorders.

Kenneth Moore received his Bachelor of Science in Zoology from California State University at Long Beach and a Ph.D. in Cell Biology from the University of Iowa. He is the Director of The University of Iowa Central Microscopy Research Facility, Director of The University of Iowa Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center Cell and Molecular Morphology Resource, and Co-director of the University of Iowa Center for Genetic Therapy of Cystic Fibrosis Cell Morphology Core. Dr. Moore has been active in the application of microscopy technology to biomedical and materials research for over 25 years.

NYMS Members and their guests are welcome to join the speaker for dinner (at own expense) at 5:30 p.m. at Bello Restaurant, 863 9th Ave. (56th St.). Please reserve your place(s) with Pete Diaczuk by noon March 23. The number to call him for making dinner reservations only is 917-578-3049.

NYMS Meetings are free and open to all

Morphology and Ultrastructure Revisited: Seeing Old Questions in a New Light

Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.

Monday, February 28, 2005 – 7:30 p.m.
John Jay College, 445 W 59th St. (10th Ave.), NY, NY 10019 – Room 1311, 1st Floor

The introduction of light and electron microscopy into the scientific community revolutionized our ability to visualize and understand the natural world.
Continuous improvements in these technologies have enabled us to see biological structures with increasing clarity. For example, the three-dimensional imaging capability of the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) sparked a renaissance in biological light microscopy. Similarly, the development of the field emission electron gun has made ultra-high resolution (ultrastructural) imaging possible using scanning electron microscopy. This presentation will highlight examples of how the use of these advanced imaging technologies has shed new
light on old questions of biological morphology and ultrastructure.

Angela Klaus is the Director of the Microscopy and Imaging Facility at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. She holds a Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology from Rutgers University, and her research interests include sperm structure/function relationships, sperm and somatic 3-D nuclear architecture, and the development of imaging and analysis techniques applied to questions of biological importance. A life member of NYMS, she is currently serving on its board of managers.

NYMS Members and their guests are welcome to join the speaker for dinner (at own expense) at 6:00 p.m. at Bello Restaurant, 863 9th Ave. (56th St.). Please reserve your place(s) with Pete Diaczuk by noon Feb. 28. The number to call for making dinner reservations only is 917-578-3049.

Free Event for the Public

COURSE:

Bernard Friedman Memorial Workshop

The Spindle Stage

December 5, 2004

A course on the use of the Spindle Stage.

The workshop will consist of of lectures and hands on labs to cover the theoretical and practical aspects of the Spindle Stage. Materials covered will include choosing and mounting specimens, charting on the Wolfe net and the use of the xcaliber computer program The course instructors are Jan Hinsch of Leica, Inc., and N.Y.M.S. Instructor Don O’Leary.

WHEN: December 5, 2004, from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.
WHERE: 30 North Mountain Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07042. Phone (973) 744-0043
COST: $125 for N.Y.M.S. members, $155 for non-members (includes membership)
Lunch and course materials are included. Checks made out to N.Y.M.S.

WHO: advanced course for those familiar with Polarized Light Microscopy.

HOW: Register using the form below. Limited to the first 12 registrants.
Return form to Don O’Leary, 6 Chittenden Road, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.

Hair and Fiber Analysis in Forensic Casework

Lisa Faber
Criminalist, NYPD Police Laboratory Department

Wednesday, October 20, 2004 – 7:30 P.M.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice
445 West 59th Street (10th Ave.), Room 1311 (First Floor), NYC

Lisa Faber is a Criminalist in the Hair and Fiber Section of the Trace Evidence Analysis Unit at the NYPD Police Laboratory. She holds a Master’s degree in Forensic Science from George Washington University and a Bachelor’s degree from Harvard University. Prior to earning her Master’s, she worked in research in the Department of Pharmacology at Cornell University Medical College. She was profiled on America’s Most Wanted last March for her work on a case involving a skeleton buried in the basement of a Midtown apartment building. She will discuss the value of hair and fiber evidence in forensic casework and how advances in DNA technology have impacted this field.

The speaker’s dinner is at 6:00 at Bello Restaurant, at Bello Restaurant 863 9th Ave (56th. Street), New York, NY, 10019(phone Peter Diaczuk for reservation 917 578 3049 ). Ask the waiter to seat you with the New York Microscopical Society group.

Klaus Kemp will demonstrate his Slide-Making Technique and CD-ROM Diatom Database

1:00 P.M., Sunday, October 24, 2004

New York Microscopical Society, at Evergreens 30 North Mountain Ave., Montclair, NJ 07042 (973) 744-0043

Mr. Klaus Kemp, of Microlife Services, will use his own microscope and mechanical manipulator to demonstrate how he makes exquisite slides with diatoms and butterfly scales. He will also offer some of his slides for sale. Examples of Mr. Kemp’s work can be viewed on his website, http://www.diatoms.co.uk/

Please tell Don O’Leary that you are coming. Call Don at (201) 797-8849 or send email to donoleary@att.net.

Effects of Environmental Exposure on Human Scalp Hair Root Morphology

Alison Domzalski

Criminalist II at the Office of Chief Medical Examiner, Forensic Biology Department
Wednesday, September 22, 2004 – 7:30 P.M.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Ave. (at 59th St.), Room 610T, NYC

This presentation will detail the morphological changes of hair roots upon exposure to indoor experimental environments of soil burial, water immersion, and ambient air. Different variables were explored in this study, such as levels of root keratinization (as determined by growth phase of the hair), and condition of environments (sterile vs. non-sterile). This was done to suggest a link between level of root keratinization and susceptibility to degradation. Sterilization of environments via autoclaving was conducted to ascertain whether the source of degradation was microbial. Hair root examination was done with brightfield light microscopy, and photomicrographs illustrating this will be shown. The similarity between environmental hair root degradation and postmortem root banding will be briefly discussed.

Alison Domzalski received a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from Michigan State University and a Master of Science in Forensic Science from John Jay College of Criminal Justice. At her place of employment, OCME, she has assisted with research on extraction of nuclear DNA from hair shafts.

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